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Full text of "Common School Speller"

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!dDcT 

■ '22 



CO 



tA^^Tnsl.do. X 3H 



Satbatti College l-itaij 

THE GIFT OF 
GINN AND COMPANY 



3 2044 097 064 935 



Common School Speller 



• • ex • « 



E. C. Branson, 



Teacher of Pedagogy in Georgia State Normal School^ Author of ^^Metiiodc 

of Teaching Reading,^ etc. 



FIRST BOOK 



RICHMOND, VA.t 

B. F. Johnson Pubushing Company 

1900. 



V 



T'n 5^. 00. io^ 



GINN & COMPANY 
MARCH 17, 1927 



Copyrignt, 

E. C BRANSON. 

1900. 




02-7-H. 



PREFACE. 



This book is the result of ten years' endeavor in 
the schoolroom to hasten the reading process. It 
is an attempt to increase the quantity and better the 
quality, to add to the pleasure and lessen the drudg- 
ery of reading in our schools ; and only incidentally 
to accomplish what is also a necessary thing — to 
make the pupils good spellers. 

It contains the staple vocabulary of the common- 
school text-books — words for which the pupil has 
constant use — and in addition, many every-day 
words which are frequently misspelled and mis- 
pronounced. 

The arrangement exhausts the sign-and-sound 
analogies of common words. Richard Grant White 
claims, and properly, that it is only on the basis of 
such analogies that the child can determine for itself 
the value of new word forms. 

Though limited in extent, these analogies are 
numerous and very varied. Thus, there are one 
hundred and twenty- one ways of indicating the 
vowel sounds of our language. Add the numerous 
combinations of consonants, and you will see what 
a multitude of perplexing mechanical difificulties 



4 

confront the child in learning to read and write 
English, and why it takes the English child three 
times as long to read English easily as it takes the 
German child to read German. 

A spelling book that ignores these sign-and-sound 
analogies naturally retards the reading process, as 
it fails to eliminate many of the mechanical per- 
plexities of reading. 

This book especially emphasizes at the start the 
monosyllables (about 3,500) and the dissyllables 
(about 4,200) in common use. Within these limits 
the difficulties of self-tuition are disposed of on the 
basis of analogy, for, as Dr. Bain has well said, the 
difficulties of English spelling are practically ex- 
hausted in our monosyllabic words. 

While the book embodies in a general way the 

aims common to all spelling books, it is only fair 

to say that it is built upon a distinct pedagogic 

purpose. 

E. C. BRANSON. 

state Normal School^ 
Athens, Go, 



TO THE TEACHER. 



1 . A Spelling book cannot be a dictionary ; but 
through it the pupil should be led into the habitual 
use of the dictionary. 

Make the lessons short and require pupils to 
frame sentences which will indicate the meaning and 
use of all words not beyond their comprehension. 
Bear in mind that the full value of words is ac- 
quired not in a day nor from any one book, but little 
by little through a lifetime. 

2. A Spelling book cannot be an encyclopedia, 
and therefore no attempt is made in this book to 
impart general information ; yet there is in the sen- 
tences presented for dictation a steady purpose to 
influence character. 

3. The vocabulary has been selected from com- 
mon school text-books — mainly the readers in gen- 
eral use — and in matter and arrangement is de- 
signed to aid the pupil in mastering these books. 

4. Bear in mind that the child is not in full pos- 
session of a word until its forms (spelling and pro- 
nunciation), meaning and use are all known. 

5» For further suggestions on the teaching of 
Spelling as a direct aid to reading, see ** Branson's 
Methods in Reading and Spelling." 



THE ALPHABET. 



a a^ 



apple /^^^'-l ay|ay|ai^ 



A a 



b I 



bug 



c o 



cat 



d cL 



dog 



e V 



f P 
h L 



ear 



fish 
goat 



hen 



1 1/ 



Ida 




I 



{AXV 



B 13 




OCUy 




dL 



O 



<^ 







exLA/ 



O/OoJu 

Yvuru 




JlcLoy 



c c 
E e 

F i^ 



I J 



1 t 



m TYV 



11 TV 



jam 

kite 
lion 



moon 



nest 



o o- 



P 1^ 



owl 



V 



S 5^ 



pig 

qnail 



rat 



saw 



t t Itub 




^ 



a/my 



J 




wiko 




[Axy-Tv 




- yTnxxvTv 




TU/ciX' 




CMX)- 



I 



^- H 



r 




p 



ly 




Tl 





CUAXXAyl 



VoX 



4XlyU> 



o a 

p p 

R R 

T 3 



8 



11 [Ay 



Y -u- 



urn 




W u> 



X oo 






violet 




uA/ru 



iXMxt 



OMX)^ 



watch 




OMzuton/ 



u u 




JIxAxX/CCi/ 



yoke "u""^^ -ux^fcty 



IVlXU 



zebra 




^ 



WVJ 



X X 



TU 



Z 




OnJujo, pCKAA/ (3, 4), iJrxAjX {hjy cLooA/; 



COMMON SCHOOL SPELLER^ 

FIRST BOOK. 



an 

man 

ran 

fan 

can 



men 
pen 
ten 
hen 



short vowel sounds, 

Lesson 1. 



a/w 
po/rv 



pan 
tan 
am 
ham 



ca/w ram 

I am a man. 

Lesson 2. 
Tyu/>^ him 

kiA/y\j rim . 

\jjr\y dim 

YXAjru Tom 




CX/YYV 
hxX/YYV 

\jojYy\j 



% 

\A/YY\J 
6jurYY\j 



Ben ran a hen. 



^^-j^-— ■ t^^?^ Be/w \xx/Y\^ Qy ru/rv . . 




in 

fin 

pin 

sin 

tin 

kin 

win 



at 

mat 

Nat 

rat 

sat 

fat 



t/w 

tlA/Y\y 
YVUYV 



10 

Lesson 3. 
on 

run 

fun 

hem 

hum 

sum 



uM/w ■ gum 

Lesson 4. 
cx>t hat 

rba)t 






Nan has a fat cat. 



Lmrv 

rU/YYV 
\\AX/YY\j 
(lAA/YYV 
C^AA/YY\y 



3la/t/ c>cut ^yo/w out 








11 








Lesson 5. 




a? 


clA^ 


sit 


jui; 


has 


nxUi/ 


fit 


f^ 


is 


tA- 


hit 


hlk 


his 


KxA/ 


bit 


■ !^t 


it 
mit 


■yyxaJG 


pit 
liit 




Ut 


u 


wit 


LUvt 




The cat bit me. Si vuA' ruyvrv. 






Lesson 6. 




ox 


oo:> 


let 


Itb 


box 
fox 
met 


'WUyt 


pet 
get 
wet 




net 

set 

< 


TUyt 


yet 

■ yes 


-1^ 






i has 


a pet fox. 






LOCC' 


f)-Lt (xi/vn/. 



12 



16t 

not 

rot 

cot 

dot 

hot 

pot 



cab 

Eab 

pod 

if 

us 



Lesson 7. 




U; 


nut 


TuoX/ 


noxvt 


hut 


YXAxXy 


\x>t 


but 


maJ^ 


oot 


cut 


caaA) 


dot 


mix 


rYXA/DC/ 


ruvt 


fix 


AXX/ 


^ao4y 


six 




Tom has six 


3et hens. 




cJomy la>cu^ ^Myoo 


ja^ YXA/VJ^. 


Lesson 


8. 




CCL/U- 


web 


\amJ>- 


Raiv 


rib 


A, 'P 


|ax>cL 


bib 


P ' P 




rob 


^XM> 


uA/ 


sob 


?U>U- 


The lad had 


a bat. 




c3rUy LcudL KVCudL O/ lKI>t. 


^ 



18 

Lesson 9. 

cob ocvfv Ned TLe.cL 

job uMv^ fed pexiy 

rub ' \AAA>^ red VxL 

tub tuAv led luL 

had nxxxL bed iHxL 

lad Ocx^ rod 'uxdL 

mad TnyCUcL pod ja/Cndy 

The hen hid in a box. 

OnA/ nJUYXy YuAj {/W CV IKMX>. 

Lesson 10. 

lid UxL hog nxx^ 

rid \AxL log UM^ 

hid ruxL dog clxK^ 

did dluL cog CKM^ 

kid mxL fog U^ 

mud TWUxL ax oux/ 

bud iMxcL wax u>cux/ 

A big dog ran at us. 

CL iMX^ oUk^ ^xwv cut uA^. 








u 






Lisaosll. 




n&g 


-VUK^ 


k^ 


fwx^ 


lag 


boucy 


beg 


(nxj' 


rag 


-Kuy 


pig 


w 


bag 


(kkj. 


dig 


cLwj^ 


tag 


taxj^ 


big 


tuj. 






jig 


m- 






Jack is 


my nag. 






cfclA-' 


tna/u/TUCu^ 




Lesson 12. 




i*p 


^ay|a' 


Sip 


Ju/ja/ 


sap 


£W3>|d/ 


lip 


ti/ja/ 


map 


TvvaAi/ 


dip 


d*Jp^ 


lap 


Loyjo/ 


Up 


ruJfty 


nap 


-wo/jax 


tip 


t^a. 




aoyja/ 


Zip 


?4^ 




Zip is 


my pet dog. 






•l^^ lA/ Yn/\^ jo^t <^^'*^^- 





16 








Lesson 13. 




mug 


TWUX^ 


cijp 


(yuJpj 


rag 


'UX^ 


sup 


Cvu/ja- 


bug 


lu^ 


lop 


M> 


dug 


cWj- 


mop 


'YYVO-^ 


hug 


mx/^ 


top 


to-^ 


m 


r^ 


hop 


ho-^ 


pog 


IpAJX^ 


fop 


H^ 


Beg, Zip, beg! 


m 


Btxj.,^! 




Lesson 14. 




pans 
hens 




tilbs 
lads 




pins 


jai/nA- 


Ud8 


UAa- 


rats 


YO/tjV 


hogs 


U/x^ 


cats 


ooyfev 


nags 


Tl/CLX^ 


pets 


^M^A- 


pigs 


jaixj^ 


nuts 


YU/i^ 


caps 


CKxyji^ 


cuts 


CMxiXV 


lips 


uJfi^ 



I have six pets. St nxxAHy ^wxx/ ja^J^. 



1« 





UMO VOWBL 50UNnS. 






Lbsson 15. 


1 


J! 


go 


be 


hju 


no 


me 


yruu 


80 


we 


UMy 


oh 


be 


u 


ho 


tbe 


Uuy 


by 


she 


iJu/ 


my 



T\XV 

Zip has my cap on his head ! 

He is on the box. Sit up, Zip ! 

J^ tyJi/ cvrv trU/ U<MX>. j^lt uAiy, <>^aJ^ 

Lesson 16. 
bab«i u-oAK/ madis 

face pcuoe^ wade 

mace mxix>t/ safe 

lace IcuU/ age 

pace ^qxlqAj cage 

race XojoAy page 

fade f<x>cLt/ rage 






17 
Lesson 17. 



cake CAjJu^ gale 

lake LaJu/ pale ja-aXey 

make tyvoJzo sale iioJuy 

rake 'xxxk^ came cmwvU/ 







I can bakt 


J a cake. 






J 'VwcucLt 


' Oj OCL/fUy 






Lo-V 'YYXXX/YYX/VyVOy 


gams 
lame 


Lesson 18. 
(^<x/Yn^ lanis 
Lo/YYU/ pane 




name 
same 
tame 
cane 


'n^cL/vrUy 


ape 
cape 
tape 
base 


U-CUU/ 


vane 


OKi/yw^ 


case 


eoA^ 



date 

gate 

hate 

late 

gave 



mere 

here 

Pete 

eve 

ice 

dice 



18 

Lesson 19. 
cJiV pavisi 

dxxtv 

nxxti/ wave 

LcJa/ daze 

c^/ouTo-v gaze 

Lesson 20. 



rave 



save 



"YYXAAA/ 
huOVU 

trxHy 



micis 

nice 

rice 

hide 

ride 

side 



Here are my tame mice. They ^ 



hide in the cage. 



\AXXAHj 
cLcLO>ty 



« 




YXAxLv vr\y Vruu c>ax^ 



19 

Lesson 21. 



tidis 

fife 

Uke 

pike 

file 






dimis 

time 

fine 

line 

vine 



life Vi^ 

wife u>i|^ 

mile TVuXe^ 

pile ^oJuiO 

A pike is a fish. 

I like to fish for 
pike. 

Lesson 22. 

cULooo/e/ limis 

vumA/ dine 

p 







mne 
mine 
wine 



t 

% 



pipe *^iaJ^ ripe 'wla/ey 

wipe \ah)qAj fir^ pt/U^ 

I had a fine time fishing. I have nine fish. 





20 








Lesson 23. 




blr« 


fwu/ 


mir^ 


■yyuAAj 


wire 


UMAAy 


tire 


tlA/C/ 


bite 


titv 


vice 


OH/Gt/ 


dire 


Aa/v-v 


wise 


LLKA^ 


live 


Iaamj 


kite 


luXn, 


bile 


lOo 






Can you 


dive? I can 






Here I go! 






Ca/wixo-u/ cUaK/' 






J! 


c<x/n/. 






iilAAy J c^l 








Lesson 2i. 




hivs 


yu/\Hj 


wok^ 


LLKMt^ 


rode 


"uocU/ 


hole 


(lott/ 


yoke 


a^x)-vt^ 


pole 


jaolfy 


mole 


TTboXt/ 


sole 


fiott/ 


Here is a 


mole. His fur 


18 soft. He likes bugs. 


jitA/t/ lA- o/ -vru>tt/. 


^WX^pU/U 


L^£i/oXt. 




Maj liiwA- (maxjA/. 





21 

Lesson 25. 



hoinisi 


\\x>^YY\JU bonis 


toOO/t/ 


lone 
tone 


hy^YVU pone 
toTUy hope 




rope 
bore 


'ixyja^ ore 
\yoAJU core 


OAJU 


^^,... ^,^ 


y.,,^^^^ My dog likes a 


bone. 



^ j;dtf t «w ^ ?^ a Mother H 



uhcJunAA/ MaaJmxxAA^ hxuL ou cLxxx'. 





Lesson 26. 




moris 


TVUVUy 


worisi 


{AJOAA/ 


tiose 


TVO^Uy 


ho§e 


nxy^Uy 


rise 




dote 


oLcvfcey 


rose 


'u^^fi^ey 


vote 


aK>>tt/ 


po§e 


jao^Uy 


note 


Tix>fcey 



Jack is lame in his fore leg. 

QxiX^it/ [^ \XX/YY\JU i/YV VU^ pOA^ U/^. 

Come here, Jack! 



22 

Lesson 27. 
rove 'booK/ wove u>cx\>e>/ 

doze (Lo<XAy cube CAAAHy 

tube t\AAHy use UA/Jy 

huge ruAX^ mule ryvuXe^ 

Yule llxxXey tune tu/vu^ 

Yule-tide means Christmas time. 

[AAAZiAAxLv TY\AXX/Y\Ay Q)rJ\AJ^JuyyXOJ^ 

I had a fine time Christmas. 

Jl rucLxi/ cu \a/y\Aj ^a/yyxju Q)rJ\A^JuyY)j:xJ^. 

Lesson 28. 

curls C/UA^ luris \akAju 

pure \iAAy\Ay sure CuAA^e^ 

mu§e TWuA^ u§e uAA/ 

mute Tvi/a/t^ lute Luyfce^ 

duke dAAJnAy June yu/ru^ 

The poor boy is a mute. He cannot hear me. 





28 








Lesson 29. 




bab^s 


wad^s 


lan^s 


sav^s 


safes 


fades 


panes 


vanes 


bakes 


cakes 


apes 


hides 


iakes 


rakes 


capes 


rides 


takes 


wakes 


dates 


sides 


bales 


gales 


gates 


tides 


sales 


games 


hates 


fifes 


names 


tames 


mates 


likes 


canes 


dames 


rates 


pikes 


cXV-VCUcL A/V-ol}<xJuAyO-^hjOur^ JOAj \XlXlJky 




aavUx^ nxjuOM, 






OyyVcL OXXMAAy, 






Tjesson 30. 




fll^s 


vTn^s 


hlr^s 


cod^s 


dikes 


pipes 


sires 


yokes 


miles 


wipes 


wires 


moles 


piles 


wiles 


bites 


spines 


dimes 


limes 


dines 


holes 


lines 


pines 


mires 


poles 


fines 


wines 


tires 


soles 


times 


fires 


kites 


homes 



%<XQMy\ ci)t \J^ ux/fcey. 



24 





Tjesson 31. 




cOn^s 


hop^s 


rOv^s 


dupi^s 


tones 


ores 


tubes 


mutes 


ropes 


cores 


cubes 


dukes 


bores 


notes 


mules 


lutes 


bones 


votes 


tunes 


waves 


zones 


coves 


cures 


hives 




Lesson 32. 






Copy and flemorize. 

I. 





MaJu it o-Tv vtlo kuxxcL; 



II. 



L(Jn>e/n/ oaxvu^'oK/ \AMyAAv to dLo, 

JU-o it w-Wru cv waaJL] 
cJru/uy u>i^x> Vxxx2iv trU/ fcoja^, 

cJiA/^ Tn^uA/t QAA/rrdy- vru/ hjlX/ 



HI. 






25 
SHORT VOWBL SOUNDS. 





Lesson 33. 




back 


hack 


Jack 


lack 


nack 


pack 


rack 


sack 


tack 


beck 


deck 


neck 


peck 


Dick 


kick 


lick 


rick 


tick 


nick 


pick 


wick 


dock 


lock 


filch 


rock 


sock 


duck 


gulch 


mock 


luck 


tuck 


milch 



Copy. 



act add gift miff 

fact odd lift tiff 

tact of (6v) sift doff 

bade off rift buff 

have if oft cuff 

egg ill loft huff 

ebb lisp soft muff 

inn left tuft puff 

Copy. 



26 





Lesson 35. 




self 


wdd Nell 


fill 


pelf 


bell pell 


gill 


golf 


cell sell 


gill 


gulf 


dell till 


hill 


de^t 


fell well 


Jill 


bulb 


sill yell 


minx 


held 


tell bill 

Copy. 

The bee has honey in her cell, 

I have honey to sell. 

The gill of the fish is red. 

Four gills make one pint. 

Lesson 36. 


lynx 


ditch 


belt tilt 


and 


hitch 


felt wilt 


band 


pitch 


melt elk 


hand 


botch 


welt ilk 


land 


notch 


gilt milk 


sand 


elin 


hilt silk 


end 


helm 


jilt ' bulk 


bend 


film 


kilt hulk 


fend 


kilH 


silt sulk 


lend 


mend 


rend tend 


wend 



Copy. 



"XAOAAy G^CUTU't, aX<MAy'Uy TU/LKA/ cix> W^TuCxX/ 

'XAOAA,' cxx/ru." 







27 








Lesson 37. 




wind 


pinch 




gang 


dong 


fond 


bunch 




hang 


gong 


pond 


hunch 




sang 


long 


fund 


munch 




ding 


song 


bench 


punch 




ring 


bung 


inch 


bang 




sing 


hung 


finch 


fang 




wing 


lung 


rung 


sung 




Ann 


hymH 



Copy. 

JVmd in your kite string. 
The wind is too strong. 
The bell is rung- at eight. 
He wrung his hands in fright. 

Lesson 38. 

bank kink hank lank 

tank wink link mink 

sink sunk bunk junk 

punk cent dent pant 

rant bent sent lent 

pent rent dint tent 

vent went tint hint 

sank mint lint font 

Mother sent me six cents. 

Copy. 

OY\A^yu/Y\AAAX/\jnj^^ 



Lesson 39. 

bGnt hant pant bOsh 

brunt dash apt dish 

ash mash rapt fish 

hash wish kept gash 

dense cash wept rash 

sense lash mesh gush 

Copy. 

Sly "uxyAAy nxx/\Hy \aaaxL ojyxAj nxxAM^ 
yxxy^ uxwv, 





- 


-Phoebe Gary, 




TiESSON 40. 




tense 


hash mQsh 


tash 


len§ 


desk risk 


dusk 


rinse 


husk musk 


rusk 


since 


lisp wisp 


lamp 


manse 


mess hiss 


kiss 


miss 


toss moss 

Copy. 

" Be kind and gentle 
To those that are old, 
For kindness is dearer 
And better than gold.'* 


loss 



29 





« 


FiKSRON 41. 




fOss 


best 


lest 


pest 


rest 


vest 


West 


zest 


fist 


gist 


list 


mist 


wist 


cost 


lost 


frost 


dust 


gust 


just 


must 


rust 


mill 


pill 


rill 


sill 


till 


will 


cull 


dull 


gull 


hull 


lull 



Copy. 



"c3cK> uM>o VrutOAy l>ouXcL, iu-hj(> imaaXcL 





Lesson 42. 




help 


gQlp 


pQlp 


camp 


damp 


lamp 


tamp 


vamp 


hemp 


stamp 


gimp 


limp 


pomp 


romp 


bump 


dump 


hump 


jump 


lump 


mumps 


pump 


lam^ 


limls^ 


dumls^ 


numls^ 


badge 


Madge 


edge 


hedge 


ledge 


wedge 


ridge 


dodge 


lodge 


budge 


fudge 


nudge 


bulge 


helve 


sledge 



Copy. 






so 





Lesson 43. 




niche 


hence wfthe 


Uth 


mince 
quince 
fence 
sylph (sllf) 


pence myth 
hath width 
wi& tongs 
Ralph (Ralf ) much 


fizz 
fuzz 
buzz 
such 



Copy. 

QJy e/iK/m/nx^, xxmxa/yv J) gx> fco iHxL, 

cil ihAA^ UUO ilXkxAJ^ ilYXA/Yht/ OAHA^ 

Onxx^ cLo4y truy Tn>exixlxMA>^ op drvey 

Lesson 44. 





REVIEW 


• 




Iam1s( 


len§ 


cell 


sOch 


limb 


manse 


sell 


ditch 


dumb 


inch 


zest 


elm 


numb 


hym^ 


gill 


helm 


edge 


hence 


gill 


kiln 


sense 


gulf 


minx 


niche 


since 


dels^t 


lynx 


withe 


tense 


bulb 


much 


myth 


sylph 


Ralph 


pence 


buzz 



Copy. 







81 


* 






Lesson 45. 




WORDS COMMONLY MISPRONOUNCBD. 


tea ^ 




fire (notfi^yttr) 


Off 


9 

1 


hire 
mire 


of (6v) 

left 


din 




sire 


gift 


RSi? 




core 


lift 


pin 




more 


soft 


hem 




ri§e (verb) 


wore 


him 




rise (noun) 


held 


5n (not awn) 




tube 


till 


God 




tune 


elm(not«Kttin) 


dog 




lute 


film 


hog 


• 


bad^ 


kil^ 




i 


Tjesson 46. 




WORDS COMMONLY MISPRONOUNCED. 


log 


• 


y^llr (not yore) 


btilk 


no (not naw) 




iron (rtim} 


bfllge 


va§e 




to (too or too) 


and 


nape 




with 


sand 


6re 




Oft 


wind 


here 




act (not ac) 


pond 


mere 




fact 


kept 


like 




must 


wept 


till 




^gg (not agg) 


rinse 


mOss 




first 


toss 



82 

Lesson 47. 

1. Have these words spelled. 

2. Drill for clear enunciation. 

3. Have sentences for them. 



lofts 


acts 


rafts 


gifts 


rests 


tufts 


hints 


welds 


lists 


dusts 


vests 


gusts 


ebbs 

4 


mists 


adds 


eggs 


helves 


cuffs 


muffs 


selves 


elms 


gulfs 


bells 


tills 


milks 


kil^s 


mends 


belts 


rings 


bands 


ponds 


fangs 


bulbs 


wings 


hym^s 


winks 


desks 


sulks 


belts 


husks 


gulps 


lisps 


risks 


pumps 


pence 


sylphs 


withes 


tongs 



SENTENCB SPELLING. 

Do unto others as you would have them do unto 
you. 

Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, 
wealthy, and wise. 

Happy Tom Crump ne'er sees his own hump. 

Better be alone than in bad company. 

Speak well of your friend ; of your enemy say 
nothing. 

"If angry, count ten; if very angry, count one 
hundred." — T/iomas yefferson. 



88 



blab black bled block 

blot bluff bless bliss 

blur brad brag bran 

brat bred brick brig 

brim clod clock clan 

clam 
cleft 
clot 

Copy. 

'* M^ tJIrxxxA) lA/ c^xxkL out TY\xxhi<Y\xi^ 

Lesson 49. 



Lesson 48. 


black 


bled 


bluff 


bless 


brad 
bred 


brag 
brick 


clod 


clock 


clap 
dick 

< 


clog 
club 


diff 


clip 




I 



crag 


cram 


crack 


crock 


crop 


cross 


croft 


cress 


crib 


crick 


crumb 


crypt 


chap 


chat 


check 


chess 


chick 


chub 


chuck 


chid 


chill 


chin 


chip 


chit 


chop 


drug 


dram 


drift 


drab 


dress 


dross 


drum 



Copy. 

Hearts like doors open with ease, 
To very, very little keys ; 
And ne'er forget that they are these , 
"I thank you, sir," and "If you please." 



84 





Lesson 50. 




drill 


drip 


dwell 


dreg 


drub 


flag 


flap 


flat 


fled 


fleck 


flick 


flip 


flit 


flock 


flog 


flank 


floss 


flax 


phlox •(««■) 


^ fluff 

• 


frog 


from 


phlegm 4ttM 
gladV 


i frill 


fret 


frock 


glib 


glen 


gland 


glum 


glut 


grab 


grill 


grin 


grip 



Copy. 



grit 

grum 

plug 
plan 
skim 
skiff 



Lesson 51. 




giOg 


slop 


grnb 


knell 


knit 


knot 


knock 


knob 


prim 


prig 


prod 


plod 


prop 


plot 


pluck 


pled 


skid 


plum 


skin 


skip 


skit 


skull 


scab 


scan 



Copy. 

nAJ^AAAAy to do OU TVUXX/KV ax2/tixvn/ 



J 



86 





Lesson 52. 




skill 


SC^t 


scoff 


scQd 


still 


stab 


stag 


stick 


stack 


stun 


stock 


stem 


stuck 


stub 


swim 


stop 


swum 


stuff 


Swiss 


swam 


slack 


swell 


slap 


slab 


sled 


slam 


slid 


slick 



Copy. 

—Bible, 





Lesson 53. 




slip 


scOt 


slim 


slot 


slag 


slat 


slug 


slum 


slur 


snag 


snap 


sniff 


snip 


snib 


snub 


snuft 


spin 


snob 


shad 


shod 


snug 


sham 


shed 


shelf 


shall 


shell 


shift 


ship 


shin 


shock 


shop 


shot 


shuck 


shun 


shut 


spun 



Copy. 



1 



spSt 

spill 

spend 

strand 

struck 

scrub 

shrub 

squill 

yell 



TiKssmr 54^ 




spbdL 


specjc 


spf^ll 


spin 


spit 


spot 


smack 


smeJl 


smut 


strap 


slress 


strip 


strum 


stout 


sprat 


scrap 


shiiU 


scrim 


shr^ 


shrimp 


scum 


split 


squib 


squid 


trig 


tram 


track 



Cory. 



— Holmes. 

Lesson 55. 

trap tress trick 

trim trip ^us 

trod trot truck 

thud thug thin 

that &em ^en 

thrift thrill throng 

thrum thrust twit 

Whig whist whisp 

Copy. 

ru>-t do, 



trill 

truss 

^is 

than 

theft 

throb 

whack 

when 



87 

Lesson 56. 

whet whiff whim whip 

whit whiz wreck wrap 

wren writ quip quack 

quick quill quell quid 

quiz quit quench quest 

Wrap your shawl about you. 

My playmates rap at the door. 

He slept in an inn. 

Copy. 

Lesson 57. 



blocks 


blots 


brigs 


clocks 


clams 


clubs 


cliffs 


crabs 


crags 


cracks 


crumbs 


chicks 


drugs 


drums 


dregs 


flags 


flocks 


frills 


knits 


knocks 


knots 


knucks 


knobs 


plums 


skiffs 


shelves 


whisps 


shifts 


shreds 


thrusts 


twits 


thefts 



Copy. 







88 








Lesson 58. 




batch 


fetch 




flitch 


mOch 


catch 


vetch 




stitch 


such 


hatch 


wretch 




switch 


blotch 


latch 


stretch 




which 


crotch 


match 


ditch 




twitch 


scotch 


snatch 


pitch 




botch 


splotch 


thatch 


rich 




Dutch 


clutch 


scratch 


witch 




hutch 


crutch 



Lesson 59. 

Copy and Memorize. 

" Never you mind the crowd, lad, 
Nor fancy your work won't tell ; 

The work is done for all that, lad, 
To him that doeth it well. 

Fancy the world a hill, lad, 

Look where the millions stop ; 
You'll find the crowd at the base, lad. 

There's always room at the top." 

a/wcL YuA^, 
iBuyt tru/uy, [AMVilo vnAAAy cxy^yr\J^i<i/yv- 



39 





Tjksson 60. 






REVIEW 


• 




crypt 


knit 


dwell 


phlOx 


knell 


knob 


knot 


knucks 


knock 


throb 


scum 


skim 


scan 


spell 


Swiss 


shelf 


shall 


shrub 


scrap 


shred 


shrill 


wrap 


squill 


theft 


thrust 


quit 


wren 


wreck 


quick 


whisps 


quell 


crumbs 


shelves 


switch 


thefts 


skiffs 


thatch 


Dutch 


rich 


wretch 


which 


quench 


much 


such 




Lesson 61. 





DICTATION SPELLING. 

A horse was going down the street. All at once 
he stopped and would not go on. The driver swore 
at him. Then he beat him, but he would not go a 
step. 

A kind-hearted man passed by and saw the trouble. 
He gave the horse a whisp of hay, patted him on the 
neck, and coaxed him along. In a minute the stub- 
born horse was ready to go along. ''Patience and 
kindness will do more than swearing and beating," 

§^id the man to the driver. 



9 



40 

Lesson 62. 
words commonly hispronouncbd. 

[Drill for clear enunciation.] 




theft 

thefts 

cross 

dross 

floss 

since 



shred 

shreds 

whisps 

cnjjiijj, 

from 

trust 



shrill 

thrift 

thrust 

thrusts 

catch 

rinse 



aren't stands 

't will 

doesn't 

e'er 

haven't 

he's 

I'll 

I've 

isn't 

mayn't 

't was 

can't 



Lesson 63. 
contractions. 

[Write a sentence for each one.] 

for are not 

it will 

does not 

ever 

have not 

he is 

I will 

I have 

is not 

may not 

it was 

can not 

Copy. 



don't stands for do not 


didn't 


* did not 


he'll 


* he -will 


hasn't * 


* has not 


hadn't 


* had not 


it's 


' it is 


I'm 


' I am 


let's 


' let us 


'tis 


' ' it is 


sha'n't 


shall not 


won't * 


* will not 






41 





Lesson 64. 




tract 


scalp 


clamp 


- cramp 


champ 


scamp 


stamp 


chasm 


spasm 


bland 


crimp 


brand 


gland 


grand 


stand 


strand 


sprang 


clang 


slang 


flange 


twang 


blank 


crank 


drank 


flank 


frank 


prank 


plank 


stank 


shank 


spank 


thank 



Copy. 








Lesson 


65 




shrank 


thatch 


scratch 


delve 


helve 


twelve 


dredge 


fledge 


badge 


lodge 


judge 


bridge 


pledge 


sledge 


twelfth 


knelt 


spelt 


whelp 


length 


strength 


drench 


clench 


trench 


wrench 


squelch 


French 


stench 


blend 


spend 


trend 


spent 


crept 


slept 


fresh 


blest 


crest 



Copy. 






84 





Lesson 50. 




drill 


drip 


dwell 


dreg 


drub 


flag 


flap 


flat 


fled 


fleck 


flick 


flip 


flit 


flock 


flog 


flank 


floss 


flax 


phlox ^Mit) 


^ fluff 

• 


frog^ 


from 


phlelm^ttteaj 

gladV 


^ frill 


fret 


frock 


glib 


glen 


gland 


glum 


glut 


grab 


gnll 


grin 


g»»p 



Copy. 



grit 
grum 

(j,.y press 
plug 
plan 
skim 
skiff 



Lesson 51. 




grog 


slop 


grGb 


knell 


knit 


knot 


knock 


knob 


prim 


prig 


prod 


plod 


prop 


plot 


pluck 


pled 


skid 


plum 


skin 


skip 


skit 


skull 


scab 


scan 



Copy. 



86 





Lesson 52. 




skill 


SC&t 


scoff 


sctid 


still 


stab 


stag 


stick 


stack 


stun 


stock 


stem 


stuck 


stub 


swim 


stop 


swum 


stuff 


Swiss 


swam 


slack 


swell 


slap 


slab 


sled 


slam 


slid 


slick 



Copy. 

—Bible, 

Lesson 53. 



slip 


scOt 


slim 


slot 


slag 


slat 


slug 


slum 


slur 


snag 


snap 


sniff 


snip 


snib 


snub 


snuff 


spin 


snob 


shad 


shod 


snug 


sham 


shed 


shelf 


shall 


shell 


shift 


ship 


shin 


shock 


shop 


shot 


shuck 


shun 


shut 


spun 



Copy. 



44 



scribe 

grace 

price 

splice 

glade 

trade 

pride 

strife 

ache 

slake 



Lesson 


70. 




X>NG VOWBL 50UND5. 




Swed(^ 


brtb^ 


trlb^ 


globe 


probe 


brace 


place 


space 


trace 


slice 


trice 


twice 


thrice 


shade 


blade 


grade 
bride 


chide 


spade 


stride 


glide 


slide 


chafe 


strode 


stage 


broke 


l^nife 


flake 


quake 


drake 


spake 


spike 


stake 


Lesson 


71. 





DICTATION SPELLING. 

What does little birdie say, 

In her nest at peep of day ? 
'* Let me fly," says little birdie, 
** Mother, let me fly away." 
** Birdie, rest a little longer, 

Till the little wings are stronger." 

So she rests a little longer, 

Then she flies away. 

What does little baby say. 

In her nest at peep of day ? 

Baby says, like little birdie, 
*' Let me rise and fly away." 
** Baby, sleep a little longer. 

Till the little limbs are stronger." 

If she sleeps a little longer. 

Baby, too, shall fly away. —Tem^son. 



46 





Lesson 72. 




spok^ 


brok^ 


chok(5 


stOk<^ 


stole 


smoke 


stroke 


fluke 


smile 


while 


stile 


style 


plane 


whale 


stale 


crane 


spine 


brine 


swine 


shine 


shrine 


^ine 


twine 


whine 


stone 


shone 


drone 


prone 


crape 


grape 


throne 


scrape 


gripe 


snipe 


shape 


stripe 


grope 


slope 


tripe 


cho§e 




Tjesson 73. 





Copy and Reproduce. 
DICTATION 5PBLLIIS0. 



There are queer little houses, 
We all of us know, 

And we carry them with us 
Wherever we go. 

Are they built, do you think, 
Of wood, bricks, or stones ? 

No, these funny houses 
Are all built of bones. 



WithyfejA they are cushioned, 
Without and within; 

Drawn over the whole. 
Is a pretty white jA/». 

Though you each own a house, 
Tm sure you'll confess 

That its use and its name 
You never can guess. 



I suppose I must tell you. 

So list, and you'll hear : 
Your queer little house 

Is — your body, my dear. 



46 





Lesson 


74. 




chas^ 


the§)$ 


clo§<^ 


p!at(s 


tho§e 


crate 


grate 


smite 


skate 


state 


slate 


write 


quite 


spite 


trite 


lathe 


lithe 


tiAe 


quoth 


smote 


white 


writhe 


snake 


spume 


wrote 


quote 


crave 


grave 


flute 


smote 


slave 


shave 


l^nave 


brave 


drive 


thrive 


breve 


stave 


grove 


stove 




Lesson 


75. 






DICTATION SPELLING. 




• 


Copy and Reproduce. 





(l/YxAy rrUXX/YV to cbo l/t \ ^JJiM /\A/: 

rWiK/i/ lot it fwy l^ Kxii^Ky^; ^He^ 
JUo lyt yiuUlyiy, Widl^' ^^^h^ 

(CUv Tbot rvuxkAy ou joooAy vdocaaA>>o, 

— noebe Cory, 



47 

Lessox 76. 



blaz^ 


craz^ 


glaz^ 


graz^ 


froze 


paste 


baste 


haste 


chaste 


range 


grange 


change 


blame 


flame 


frame 


shame 


theme 


clime 


chime 


crime 


grime 


prime 


slime 


ti^yme 


flume 


vagH^ 


type 


rl^yme 


plume 


plagH^ 


style 


sls;ythe 


store 


rogH^ 


pyre 


knife 


chore 


swore 


lyre 


snore 




TiESSON 


77. 





SBNTENCB SPBLLINO. 

The horse trots in fine style. 

The beggar rested on the stile. 

A lyre is a kind of harp with strings. 

A liar is always a coward. 

Payne wrote ** Home, Sweet Home." 

He learns his lessons by rote. 

K plane is a tool for smoothing surfaces. 

"Lead forth my soldiers into Xh^ plaint 

" It is better to do well than to say well.** 

'* He who does his best does well." 

Come off the roof of that house ! 



chasm 

sixth 

knelt 

wrest 

phlegm 

bridge 

wring 

chintz 

twixt 



crumb 

ninth 

shrine 

place 

lithe 

quote 

thrive 

clothe 

rhyme 



48 

Lbsson 78. 

REVIEW. 

spasm 

twelve 

tenth 

length 

wrist 

which 

hinge 

prism 

copse 

Lesson 79. 

RBVIBW. 

shrunk style 

brusque Swede 

ache quake 

chose 



flange 


shrank 


twelfth 


fifth 


quell 


dwelt 


strength 


drench 


stitch 


bUthe 


glimpse 


prince 


cringe 


twinge 


wnst 


width 


bronze 


thumb 



crape 

grate 

tithe 

quoth 

cloves 

vague 



quite 

lathe 

wrote 

froze 

plague 



knife 

twice 

chase 

write 

bathe 

knave 

range 

thyme 

rogue 



49 

Lesson 80. 

la'dy dain'ty cro'ny e^sy 

ba'by daiiy ho'ly treat'y 

la'zy gai'ly sto'ry wea'ry 

cra'zy rain'y po'§y grea'sy 

va'ry shin'y ro'sy gree'dy 

wa'ry on'ly tro'phy flee'cy 

cha'ry i'vy port'ly fee'ble 

sha'dy i'cy du'ty b^S^u'ty 

gra'vy spi'cy ru'by pot^l'try 

pas'try ti'ny fu'ry dai'sy 

hoi^r'y sly'ly sureiy po'ny 

state'ly glo'ry like'ly pu'ny 

Lesson 81. 

dictation spellinq. 

"Wish not so much to live long as to live well. 
Whatever. is begun in anger is ended in shame. 
Blame-all and Praise-all are two blockheads. 
Keep thy shop, and thy shop will keep thee. 
A lie stands on one leg, the truth on two. 

Would you like to live with ease ? 

Do what you ought, and not what you please. 

God helps them that help themselves. 
He that can have patience can have what else he 
will." — Poor Richard {Benj. * Franklin^ 



50 





TiESSON 82. 


• 




SHORT VOWEL SOUNDS. 




plaid 


brfti\d 


me^nt 


fK6st 


said (sM) 


ste}\d 


cle>,nse 


Dre^st 


say§ (s&) 


spread 


drei\mt 


friend 


deii,f 


threii^d 


breKth 


gt^ess 


de^th 


health 


breadth 


an'y (fin^y) . 


de^ 


stealth 


swe^t 


man'y (m&i^y) 


leM 


reJ\lm 


threii^t 


a gain' (a gtoO 



Copy. 

Ima/yxx^ (^<><><L u\<xrr[y urxy a/r\/\x/ oX/rxA/v 

Lesson 83. 

wash (wOsh) 

swan 

swap 

wasp 

what 

swamp 

watch 

quash 

squash 

squat 

yacht (yat) 

Copy. 

jQo Lt umXi/ c>Ay ru>t out cxXu." 



bus'y (bb^y) 


was (w6z) 


been (Wn) 


wast 


sT^ve 


wan 


b^ild 


swash 


bHilt 


wand 


gHild 


wad 


gHilt 


quad 


myth 


squad 


nymph 


swab 


lymph 


squab 


sylph 


wealth 







51 

• 






Lesson 84. 




son tsttft) 


non^ (-aiu^ 


gl6v« (sttv^ 


t^Qch 


won 


come 


shove 


y^ung 


ton 


month 


dost 


tls^ugh (ttlff) 


wont 


sponge 


doth 


r^ugh 


front 


tongH^ 


do)^s 


slough (sltiff) 


one 


dove 


bl6&d 


sls^ugh (stiff) 


done 


love 


fl66d 


once 




T^mssoN 85. 





5BNTBNCB SPELLINQ. 

*^ Lead us not into temptation." 
Lead pencils are not made of lead. 
D© you like to read} Have you read "Jack the 
Giant Killer " ? 

I have been hauling corn into the bin. 

" My son^ let not sinners entice thee." 

The sun is a big ball of fire. 

Well done, little man. Our cow is dun colored. 

** Silver and gold have I none!' 

*' The holy time is quiet as a nun!' 

*• The Lord God formed man of dust!' 

Dost thou dare to do this thing ? 

Wring him by the nose. 

" Ring out the old, ring in the new." 

The knot on the tree is not large. 

Bread is the staff of life. 

A well bred boy says, Thank you. 







62 

TiEssoN 86. 






LONG VOWEL 50UND5. 




bay 


day 


fey gay 


hay 


jay 


lay 


May may 


nay 


pay 


ray 


say way 


bray 


clay 


dray 


flay fray 


gray 


pray 


play 


stay slay 


sway 


tray 


stray 


spray aye 


prey 




aye (a) 


means ever, always 






aye (l) 


means yes. 





Lesson 87. 

sbntbncb spelling. 

A day is twenty-four hours long. . 

A dey is a Turkish prince. He is also called a bey. 

Daniel did pray in the lions' den. 

He did not become x}ci^ prey of the lions. 

And I shall be Queen of the May. 

May I get some water? You may. 

Do not use can for may. 

I vote aye (l). I vote no. 

**For his mercies aye (a) endure." 

"So nigh is Grandeur unto dust; 

So near is God to man ; 
When Duty whispers low, Thou must, 

The youth replies, I can." 

" Do all the good you can in the world, and make 
noise about it" 



58 hcc.a^<^ 

Lesson 88. 



CX^ Cr^-C^ 



n4je.yj^ 



they (tha) 


aim 


trait 


aid 


waif 


bey 


maim 


straight 


laid 


faith 


dey 


claim 


maize 


paid 


wraith 


whey 


bait 


rai§e 


raid 


faint 


giey 


gait 


praise 


braid 


quaint 


prey 


plait 


ghaise 

Lesson 89. 


staid 


taint 



SENTENCE SPELLING. 

Grey is sometimes spelled gray. 

The horse has a steady gait. 

Do not swing on the gate. 

The Chinese plait their hair into a cue. 

The body of warships is covered with steel plates. 

Strait is the gate and narrow is the way. 

Straight means not crooked. 

Our hearts we raise to Thee in praise. 

The rays of sunlight wake the birds. 

The prisoner /r^^^ the judge for mercy. 

Do not lie to hide your guilt. 

Not all gUt is gold. 

I fear he has more cents than sense. 

Sing the tenth hymn. I heard him sing. 







54 










Lesson 90. 










ai like long 2 


L 




bail 


pail 


frail 


main 


drain 


fail 


quail 


snail 


pain 


grain 


hail 


rail 


trail 


rain 


lain 


jail 


sail 


fain 


vain 


plain 


mail 


tail 


gain 


brain 


stain 


nail 


wail 


flail 


chain 


Spain 


train 


twain 


strain 


sprain 


Cain 



Lesson 91. 
sentence spelling. 

Cain killed Abel. Syrup is made of cane juice. 

The man was out of jail on bail. 

A bale of hay weighs about one hundred pounds. 

The mail boy has just gone by. 

"God created man in his own image ; male and 
female created he them." 

** Jack and Jill went up the hill 
To fetch 2i pail o( water/' 

The Indians call the white men pale-{dLces. 

The sail on the ship is cut square. 

The farmers go to town on sales day. 

The rabbit has a short tail. 

I like the tale of Robinson Crusoe. 

The eggs have lain in the nest a long time. 

A long, winding lane leads to our house. 

To do right always is the main thing. 

The pony's mane is coal black. 

No painSy no gains. Thepanes of glass are square. 



65 







TiEssoN 92. 








Lang a sounds. 




vein 
skein 
sein^ 
reins 


deigTi 
feign 
reign 
neigh 


weigh freight 

sleigh y^a 

eight gr^at 
weight ^ st^ak 


j^ans 
"?Hag^ 

^ass 

eyry 



The rains came and the floods fell. 

Keep tight reins over wild horses. 

King Edward VII reigns over Great Britain. 

A seine is a net used in fishing. 

The man is sane^ not crazy. 

He did not deign to reply. 

The Dane came from Denmark. 

They^^« not to know about it. 

He/ain would have eaten of the swine's husk. 

Lesson 93. 
sentence spelling. 

I weigh ninety pounds. 

School is a long way from home. 

The weight of the cotton bale is 450 pounds. 

** Wait for the wagon, and we'll all take a ride.*' 

The sleigh bells jingle in the crisp winter air. 

To slay means to kill. 

**Ttm lives oi great men all remind us 
We can make our lives sublime." 
The grate was filled with coal. 
Vi^^isteak is good diet. 
His good name was at stake. 
Did you hear my pony neigh ? 
" Let your yea be yea and your nay nay^ 
Thou shalt not kill. They bake bricks in a kiln. 
I ate eight plums. 






66 








Lesson 94. 




can'dy 


gtess'5^ 


risk'y 


htisk'y 


bran'dy 


chaffy 


nim'bly 


pup'py 


fctn'cy 


fifty 


stin'gy 


pop'py 


pan'§y 


sfac'ty 


cop'y 


rud'dy 


pan'try 


twen'ty 


bod'y 


pufty 


shan'ty 


dry 


sul'ly 


sun'dry 


shag'gy 


gip'sy 


Sal'ly 


cur'ry 


tar'ry 


pig'my 


sulk'y 


flur'ry 


ber'ry 


pit'y 


bug'gy 


hur'ry 




TiE880N 


95. 




mOs'ty 


hes^v'y 


bo'ny 


na'vy 


bur'y 


stead'y 


ra'cy 


shy'ly 


(ber'ry) 


read'y 


ti'dy 


pin'y 


mer'ry 


clean'ly 


ti'ny 


pas'try 


fer'ry 


pret'ty 


du'ly 


sha'dy 


plen'ty 


(prit'ty) 


fu'ry 


dryiy 


bel'fry 


griin'ly 


ju'ry 


Ma'ry 


em|{'ty 


gKil'ty 


co'gy 


sto'ry 


^^er'y 


bu'sy (blz'zy) 


ha'zy 


poUl'try 



67 





Lesson 96. 




trem'bl^ 


m&n'gl^ 


spSln^gl^ 


Brbll^ 


frec'kle 


rat'de 


ruffle 


iMle 


nes'tle 


bat'de 


wob'ble 


tri'fle 


pes'tle 


can'dle 


cas'tle 


cy'cle 


tem'ple 


gab'ble 


buc'kle 


a'ble 


spec'kle 


gob'ble 


hag'gle 


ca'ble 


gen'tle 


pad' die 


stran'gle 


fa'ble 


ket'de 


cat'de 


bris'tle 


eVgle 


med'dlft 


sam'ple 


crip'ple 


sa'ble 




Lesson 97. 




net'de 


strQg'gle 


tan'gle 


ftc'kle 


bun'gle 


an'kle 


tat'de 


shuffle 


rum'ple 


ax'le 


sin'gle 


dim'ple 


fid'dle 


sim'ple 


rip'ple 


diis'de 


kin'dle 


mid'dle 


jum'ble 


scufde 


snuffle 


muffle 


grum'ble 


hustle 


chuc'kle 


scuffle 


bus'de 


a'cre 


mus'cle 


smug'gle 


pic'kle 


lu'cre 


rum'ble 


tac'kle 


tre'ble 


bri'dle 



o 



68 

Lesson 98. 

ea like lon^ e 

\t\ es,ch pres,ch pleSjd we^k 

pea peach bead leaf bleak 

sea reach lead sheaf creak 

tea teach mead leag^l^cieg) freak 

flea bleach read beak sneak 

plea breach l^nead leak tweak 

Copy. 

(1/YhcL nx>\A>-, a/ruL u>ru/vv, a/vvcL 

Lesson 99. 

ea like long e 

spe^k pe^l squeal dre^m le^n 

wreak seal beam gleam dean 

streak veal ream steam mean 

squeak weal seam stream wean 

deal zeal team scream clean 

meal steal cream bean heap 

Copy. 

UJt/ cxx/w tjuxxAj \hj too c>a/u.>puX 



59 







LeR80N 100. 










ea like long e 






lei^p 


e^st 


fe^st 


l^>l,Rt 


y^\sX 


reap 


eat 


beat 


feat 


heat 


cease 


meat 


neat 


peat 


seat 


crease 


cleat 


bleat 


cheat 


treat 


ea§e 


wheat 


heath 


sheath 


sheathe 


tea§e 


breathe 


wreath 


wreathe 


fear 


pleage 


heave 


weave 


ear 


tear 


peage 


leave 


cleave 


dear 


gear 


hear 


clear 


smear 


beard 


knead 


year 


drear 


spear 

Lesson 101. 


squeal 


wreak 



5BNTBNCB SPBLLINQ. 

The peel of fruit is not good to eat. 
Listen to the deep toned peal of the bell. 
*'Thou shalt not steeds 
Steel rails are used on the railway track. 
They have ears but hear not. 
"Sir, come down ere my child die." 
Here are five loaves and two fishes. 
Jasper's y9^/ was daring. 
Keep ^y feet from evil ways. 

" Do not look for wrong or evil, 

You will find them if you do ; 
As you measure for your neighbor, 

He will measure back to yoM.^' —Phoebe Cary, 







80 




• 






Lesson 102. 






9 




Long" e sound. 






bee 


fee 


gee 


lee 


see 


knee 


flee 


free 


glee 


tree 


deed 


three 


thee 


fleece 


beef 


veer 


heed 


need 


Greece 


reef 


breed 


reed 


seed 


weed 


bleed 


speed 


creed 


freed 


greed 


steed 


leek 


meek 


reek 


leech 


seek 


cheek 


Greek 


sleek 


speech 


week 


eel 


feel 


heel 


screech 


creek 


Ifneel 


peel 


reel 

Lesson 103. 


wheel 


leer 



SENTBNCe 5PBLLlNa. 

Be a man. Don't whine. 

"How doth the little busy bee^ 
Improve each shining hour." 

The dough needs to be kneaded more. 

The Welsh eat leek. 

The keg has sprung a leak. 

He is a reed shaken of the wind. 

Have you a good story-book to read} 

The horse's heel is about to heal. 

See the light of the sunset on the sea ! 

Be brave. Don't be weak ! 

Name the days of the week. 

We will praise Thee^ O God ! 



61 







Tjesson 104. 








« 


Long e sound. 


»' 


• 


seen 


deep 


geese 


sheet 


cheer 


green 


keep 


chee§e 


street 


steer 


queen 


peep 


beet 


beeves 


sneer 


screen 


weep 


feet 


sleeve 


squeeze 


spleen 


creep 


meet 


beer 


wheeze 


deem 


sweep 


fleet 


deer 


breeze 


seem 


sleep 


greet 


jeer 


freeze 


teem 


sheep 


sleet 
TiESSON 105. 


queer 


sneeze 



SENTENCE SPELLING. 

I have seen the moon in the edge of a cloud. 

It was a lovely scene. 

Be what you seem to be. 

The seam of your coat is ripped. 

The waters teem with fish. 

I have a team, of young bays. 

We planted beets in March. 

Don't beat the poor dog. 

Eve was a helpw^^/ for Adam. 

The soldiers ate mule m^at sometimes. 

The deer fled at the bay of the dogs. 

Children are dear to their parents. 



niec^ 

piece 

lief 

thief 

brief 

chief 



62 

Lesson 106. 

Long € sound. 

shriek liege 

fierce 
pierce 
tierce 
thieve 
key 



field 

shield 

yield 

fiend 

siege 



quay (ke) 
ceil 
sheik 

pique (pek) 
clique (clek) 
po lice' 



Copy. 










Lesson 107. 








ABBREVIATIONS 


• 






(Write a Sentence for each 


one.) 


E. 


stands for East 


Mr. 


stands for Mister 


W. 


(( 


West 


Mrs. 


** Mistress 


N. 
S. 


11 

it 


North 
South 


Geo. 
Jas. 


'' George 
** James 


M. 

A. M. 
P. M. 


it 

n 


Noon 

before noon 

Afternoon 


wt. 

lb. 

oz. 


** weight 
** pound 
** ounce 


P. M. 


(( 


Post Master 


qt. 


** quart 


P- 
pp. 

cts. 


l( 


page 

pages 

cents 


pt. 

ft. 

in. 


pint 

foot 

" inch 


$ 


(( 


dollars 


hr. 


" hour 


St. 


(( 


street 


R. R. 


" railroad 



cry 
dry 
fry 


cr«^s 
dries 
fries 


pry 
shy 


pries 
shies 


try 
ply 


tries 
plies 



68 

Lesson 108. 

Lang I sounds. 

crl^d pl^ pn^s 

dried fly flies 

fried sky skies 

pried sty sties 

shied wry sly 

tried thy spry 

plied why lye 

Lesson 109. 
sentence spelling. 

" The white man cries peace when there is no peace.'* 

I can make a dunce cap out of a piece of paper. 

"I had as lief go, my liege lord/' 

A plant breathes through the leaf. 

Blue-Beard had a big brass key. 

A quay^lt^^ a bank along which ships are loaded. 

C?// the house with pine lumber. 

They used to seal letters with sealing wax. 

Seal skin fur is very costly. 

To pique means to wound the feelings. 

I was piqued by what you said. 

A clique is a little band of friends. 

You do not belong to my clique. 

Copy. 




64 

Lesson 110. 

T long. 

dl^ dn^s dl^d by^ ^I$le 

lie lies lied rye i$le 

tie ties tied lye aye 

vie vies vied bfc^y g^ide 

dye dyes dyed choir guise 

eye eyes eyed (quire) guile 

iC(rts>c^uAr^^L/i^^^^ 111'. ^ ' 

SBNTBNCB SPBLLINQ. 

Brave men have died for the right. 

The yarn was dyed red. 

It is a shame to tell a lie. 

We leach the lye out of ashes to make soap. 

Who killed Cock Robin ? 
**//' said the sparrow. 
God's eye sees me always. 

''Bye, Baby Bunting ; 

Papa's gone a-hunting." 

''By-zxid'by, we'll bake a pie, 
And give the baby some," 
Cakes to sell ! Come buy. 
A quire of paper is twenty-four sheets. 
The church choir sings well. 
The aisles of the church ai e wide. 
An isle is an island. 



66 





Lesson 112. $^^ 

Fined ^ silent 


^^^^^^^9/ 


sttim'bl^ 


mGm'bl^ 


whls'tl^ 


btib^Bt^ 


prat'tle 


min'gle 


jos'tle 


rus'tle 


tri'fle 


tic'kle 


bu'gle 


tum'ble 


scut' tie 


bat' tie 


sals^'tle 


shin'gle . 


pirn' pie 


bum'ble 


trun ' die 


tin'kle 


jin'gle 


shnt'tle 


fee'ble 


lit'tle 


tin'gle 


sup'ple 


nee' die 


scrib'ble 


no'ble 


crack'le 


bee' tie 


nim'ble 


ga'ble 


sad'dle 


stee'ple 


thim'ble 


ta'ble 


dan'gle 


peis^'ple 


twin'kle 


an'gle 


jan'gle 


sprin'kle 


top'ple 


bab'ble 


ram'ble 


tric'kle 


hum'ble 


am'ble 


sic'kle 


drag'gle 


c^ti'ple 




Lesson 


113. 





DICTATION SPELLING. 

"A miser had a lump of gold, which he buried in 
the ground, coming to the spot every day to look at it. 

Finding one day that it was stolen, he began to 
tear his hair, and loudly lament. 

A neighbor seeing him, said, **Pray do not grieve 
so. Bury a stone in the hole, and fancy it is the gold. 
It will serve you just as well, for when the gold was 
there you made no use of it" — jt^sop. 





56 








Lesson 94. 


t 


can'dy 


gtess'y 


risk'y 


htisk'y 


bran'dy 


chafPy 


nim'bly 


pup'py 


fan'cy 


fifty 


stin'gy 


pop'py 


pan'gy 


six'ty 


cop'y 


rud'dy 


pan'try 


twen'ty 


bod'y 


put'ty 


shan'ty 


cit'y 


sul'ly 


sun'dry 


shag'gy 


gip'sy 


Sally 


cur'ry 


tar'ry 


pig'my 


sulk'y 


flur'ry 


ber'ry 


pit'y 


bug'gy 


hur'ry 




Lesson 


95. 




mtis'ty 


he^v'y 


bo'ny 


na'vy 


bur'y 


stead'y 


ra'cy 


shy'ly 


(ber'ry) 


read'y 


ti'dy 


pin'y 


mer'ry 


clean'ly 


ti'ny 


pas'try 


fer'ry 


pret'ly 


du'ly 


sha'dy 


plen'ty 


(prit'ty) 


fu'ry 


dry'ly 


bel'fry 


grim'ly 


ju'ry 


Ma'ry 


emf^'ty 


gHfl'ty 


co'§y 


sto'ry 


ver'y 


bu'sy (bfa^zy) 


ha'zy 


poUl'try 



67 





Lesson 96. 




trfim'bl^ 


man'gl^ 


spSLn^gl^ 


Brbl^ 


frec'kle 


rat'tle 


ruffle 


i'dle 


nes'tle 


bat'tle 


wob'ble 


tri'fle 


pes'tle 


can'dle 


cas'tle 


cy'cle 


tem'ple 


gab'ble 


buc'kle 


a'ble 


spec'kle 


gob'ble 


hag'gle 


ca'ble 


gen'tle 


pad'dle 


stran'gle 


fa'ble 


ket'tle 


cat'tie 


bris'tle 


e^'gle 


med'dle 


sam'ple 


crip'ple 


sa'ble 




Lesson 97. 




net'tle 


strQg'gle 


tan'gle 


ftc'kle 


bun'gle 


an'kle 


tat'tle 


shuffle 


rum'ple 


ax'le 


sin'gle 


dim'ple 


fid'dle 


sim'ple 


rip'ple 


this'tle 


kin'dle 


mid'dle 


jum'ble 


scuftle 


snuffle 


muffle 


grum'ble 


hus'tle 


chuc'kle 


scuffle 


bus'tle 


a'cre 


mus'cle 


smug'gle 


pic'kle 


lu'cre 


rum'ble 


tar/kle 


tre'ble 


bri'dle 



68 

Lesson 118. 



shiv'er 


bri'er 


lln'ger 


chap'ter 


liv'er 


ci'der 


lifter 


clam'ber 


sis'ter 


ci'pher 


pil'fer 


raA'er 


tim'ber 


mi'ger 


Aith'er 


scat'ter 


pitch'er 


spi'der 


tit'ter 


spat'ter 


riv'er 


moth'er 


cham'ber 


tat'ter 


sil'ver 

• 


bro'ther 


dan'ger 


shat'ter 


twit'ter 


lov'er 


man'ger 


stag'ger 


win'ter 


plov'er 


ca'per 


stran'ger 




Lesson 


119. 




bro'ker 


dln'ner 


pa'per 


tra'der 


gro'cer 


sup'per 


wa'fer 


o'ver 


clo'ver 


cin'der 


gai'ter 


dro'ver 


so'ber 


bick'er 


wa'ger 


plOt'ter 


bet'ter 


birter 


pam'per 


blot'ter 

1 


ledg'er 


hitfe'er 


ad'der 


b^ild'er 


weath'er 


gin'ger 


an'ger 


fil'ter 


feath'er 


glit'ter 


clat'ter 


hin'der 


leath'er 


fin'ger 


la^'er 


ham'per 


heifer 


slip'per 


matter 


dip'per 



69 







Lesson 120, 






bO^ 


10>f 


mO^ 


ro^ 


sO^ 


tow 


slow 


blow 


crow 


flow 


glow 


yrow 


know 


stow 


snow 


show 


throw 


orrowth 


own 


sown 


flown 


blown 


grown 


known 


thrown 


old 


cold 


fold 


hold 


mold 


sold 


scold 


told 


bolt 


colt 


dolt 


jolt 


molt 


boll 


knoll 


roll 


toll 


droll 


stroll 


scroll 


both 


loth 


quoth 

Lesson 121. 


sloth 


jowl 



SENTENCE SPELLING. 

Rome was the capital of the Caesars. 

The boys roam the fields for game. 

William Tell used to hunt the wild boar. 

The gun has a large bore. 

The teacher calls the roll every day. 

Edwin Booth played the role of Hamlet. 

No one can know everything. 

The Curfew bell was tolled at sunset. 

It toldvAi^n the fires were to be put out. 

The cotton boll has five cells. 

The bowl of the pipe is made out of a corncob. 

I row with two oars. Iron is made from iron ore. 



70 







Lesson 122. 






do^ 


do^r 


fourth 


most 


forth 


foe 


floor 


gourd 


post 


borne 


hoe 


soul 


mourn 


ford 


torn 


roe 


court 


though 


s^ord 


worn 


toe 


course 


dough 


pork 


corf^!^ 


woe 


source 


comTs^ 


fort 


gross 


beau (bo) 


four 


ghost 

Lesson 123. 


port 


sew (s< 



SENTBNCB SPELLING. 

My pocket-book is made of doe skin. 

Bread is made of dough. 

Fish eggs are called roe. See me row the boat. 

Toe the mark before you jump. 

They used to wad guns with tow. 

The river has a winding course. 

A towel is made of coarse cloth. 

]^rrf%fore feet are white. Jerry \s3J^four feet. 

A. sower went forth to sow. 

It was Xhe fourth mqnth of the year. 

Your bull gored my ox. 

There is a gourd at the spring. 

Mary's boiv is a pretty pink ribbon. 

Susie's beau is a young man. 

I am sole owner of the store. 

Lord, keep my soul from sin. 



71 







Lesson 


124 








Long Q sounds. 




dew 


few 


hew 


Jew 


mew 


new 


pew 


blew 


clew 


chew 


flew 


knew 


skew 


stew 


slew 


cue 


glue 


due 


hue 


sue 


blue 


yoQ 


jQice 


liefl 


view 


fetid 


your 


suit 
Lesson 


a diefl' 

125. 


ewe 



SENTBNCE SPELLING. 

There is a heavy dew on the ground. 

You are v /jf/^ me ten rpntQ yU^ (U^^Oie.£^% 

The stars shine in the deep, bltce sky. 

A gust of air blew out the light. 

New toys for the boys ! 

I knew Santa Claus would come. 

T>o you see Mary's little lamb? 

Its mother is a ewe. 

Your good name is more than wealth. 

A ewer is a pitcher with a wide mouth. 

The sunset sky has a golden hue. 

The wood-cutters hew down the trees. 



72 





Lesson 


126. 






PLURALS. 






[Make a sentence for each word.] 




plaids 


beasts 


squabs 


doves 


breaths 


guests 


wasps 


floods 


truths 


friends 


swamps 


braids 


realms 


sieves 


sons 


waifs 


myths 


threats 


tons 


jails 


months 


quails 


wads 


tongues 


skeins 


weights 


years 


sleighs 


feasts 


steaks 


leagues 


reams 



Copy. 



Mxx/xHy'YYuyAA^vnxik^ 





Lesson 127. 






PLURALS. 






[Make a sentence for each word.] 




tears 


knees 


fees 


Greeks 


heels 


wheels 


weeks 


sheep 


streets 


sleeves 


choirs 


pies 


sighs 


oats 


dyes 


eyes 


oaths 


roads 


coasts 


oaks 


throats 


cloaks 


rolls 


bolls 


hoes 


toes 


yourds 


combs 


posts 


swords 


gross 


ewes 


I'he 


sheep is black. 


The sheep 


are fat. 



I sold a gross of eggs. I bought two gross of eggs. 



78 







Lesson 128. 








PLURALS. 


0/ 






[(Uve a sent&iice for each word.] 
Plural. Singular. 

• 


V 


Singular. 




Plural. / 


self 




selves this 


these 


shelf 




shelves that 


those 


leaf 




leaves beau 


beaux 


sheaf 




sheaves no 


noes 


beef 




beeves mouse 


mice 


thief 




thieves man 


men 


loaf 




loaves sheep 


sheep 


knife 




knives gross 


gross 


strife 




strifes sky 


skies 


chief 




chiefs fly 


flies 


staff 




staffs, or staves cry 


cries 


clQth 




cloths, or cl04hes dye 


dyes 


pea 




peas, or pease lie 


lies 




I. 


I have three v^n^staffs. /li^^C^UUl^Ct 




2. 


The sides of a barrel are staves. 




3. 


I have good clothes. 






4. 


The tailor has a nice lot of cloths. 




5. 


I planted a bushel of pease. 






6. 


I put three peas into each hill. 






7- 


The speaker called the ayes (iz) 


and noes. 



74 







Lesson 129 


• 








REVIEW. 






plaid 


said 


says 


head 


bre^d 


health 


realm 


meant 


cleanse 


guess 


guest 


an'y 


man'y 


again' 


bus'y 


been 


sieve 


build 


guilt 


myth 


was 


want 


what 


watch 


son 


won 


front 


one 


done 


none 


some 


come 


month 


sponge 


tongue 


dove 


love 


dost 


doth 


touch 


young 


tough 


does 

Lesson 130 

REVIEW. 


nymph 

• 


wealth 


aye 


aye (l) 


they 


whey 


prey 


straight 


waif 


faith 


plait 


maize 


ghaise 


braid 


staid 


quaint 


quail 


twain 


vein 


skein 


seine 


deign 


feign 


eight 


weight 


guage 


freight 


weigh 


sleigh 


steak 


jeans 


preach 


read 


knead 


league 


weak 


speak 


zeal 


seam 


cease 


ease 


tease 


year 

1 


wheat 


breathe 


leave 


wreath 



75 







Lesson 131 


• 








REVIEW. 






weave 


spear 


beard 


yeast 


knee 


need 


kneel 


thee 


fleece 


Greece 


speech 


squeal 


wheel 


beef 


queen 


seem 


geese 


cheese 


sleeves 


queer 


squeeze 


freeze 


niece 


piece 


lief 


chief 


field 


yield 


siege 


fierce 


thieve 


key 


quay 


ceil 


pique 


clique 


cried 


fried 


pie 


thy 


lye 


dye 


eye 


tie 


buy 


choir 


quire 


aisle 

Lesson 132 

REVIEW. 


isle 

• 


guide 


guilt 


high 


fight 


might 


ninth 


sleight 


height 


oath 


Christ 


coax 


goat 


roll 


oak 


coarse 


toad 


loaves 


told 


toll 


throw 


know 


growth 


scroll 


quoth 


own 


known 


gourd 


mourn 


throe 


four 


fourth 


ghost 


most 


though 


dough 


comb 


gross 


beau 


sword 


borne 


corps 


glue 


blew 


sew 


feud 


knew 


ewe 


a dieu' 


iuice 


suit 


view 



76 

Lesson 133. 



^ 



WORDS COMMONLY MISPRONOUNCED. 



tract 

spa§m 

ehagm 

prigm 

quench 

twelfth 

fifth 

rinse (not rlnze) 



cloth 

crumls ^ 

thumls^ 

brusque (brttsk) 

twi?^ 

clos^ 

loth {or lo^th) 

lath§ 

tl^ym^ 



[Spell and Pronoance Distinctly.] 

cre^k 
rSSjlm 

again'(ag^nO 
been (bin) 
was(iiii^ 
wand*^«ii2kid)> T/ 
wont^wrfat)*- ^1 
dost (dttji> 0\ 

Lesson 134, 

doth^cM^b^ 
slough (sittff ) 
sough (sttff) 

ay^ (ever) 
^y^ (yes) 

plait 

ji^ns 

hes,r 

ye^r 



de^r 
che^r 
lief 
chiefs 
quay (key) 
clique (clek) 
OS,th 
o^^§ 



troll 

comls^ 

s^ord 

corJ($ 

blu^ 

flute 

y^ur 

suit 

des.f 



77 



» 


Lesson 135. 

a as in far. 


• 




ar^ 


bar 


car 


far 


• •• 
jar 


mar 


par 


tar 


scar 


spar 


barb 


garb 


arc 


ark 


carp 


barque (bark) 


bark 


dark 


hark 


lark 


marque (mark) 


father 


mark 


park 


shark 


stark 


spark 


bard 


card 


far'Aer 


lard 


yard 


guard 


scarf 


arch 


march 


parch 


starch 


larch 


large 


charge 


marl 

< 


snarl 


^narl 


barge 




Lesson 136. 







DICTATION SPBLLINQ. 

ARE YOU A COWARD ? 

**You dare not molest a hornet, because he is 
ready to defend himself at any moment. Then do 
not be a coward and torture a fly because he can- 
not hurt you. 

*' You are afraid of a fierce bull dog.* Then do 
not be a coward and kick or strike a small dog be- 
cause you know it has no means of defense. 

'* Be kind to helpless creatures. A fly is not so 
large as an elephant, but it can feel pain. You 
would not dare to torture the large animal, because 
he might kill you. Do not be a coward, then, and 
torture small animals, because they cannot return 
evil for evil." 

To be cruel is cowardly. 



78 



^ 





• 


Lesson 136. 










a ds in far. 






cirt 


dart 


hart. 


mart 


part 


tart 


chart 


start 


smart 


arm 


farce 


farm 


harm 


charm 


barn 


parse 


darn 


yarn 


carp 


sharp 


sparse 


harp 


carve 


starve 


harsh 


marsh 


balm 


calm 


f(salm 


palm 


qualm 


salve 


h^^art 


hearth 


gape 


dat^nt 


ga^nt 


ha^nt 


jaHnt 


talent 


vaV^nt 


flaVjnt 


lat^h 

I A. — ^t M ^ fj 


ah 


bah 



Lesson 137. 
sentence spelling. 

The skin of plants is called bark. 
A barque is a kind of three-masted vessel. 
We fly Qur kites in March. 
The drum played marchy march away. 
A pirate has no letter of marque. 
Henry Clay was a mill-boy, but he made his mark 
in the world. 

An arc is any part of the rim of a circle. 
When Noah built his ark, the floods came. 
The hart stood knee-deep in the brook. 
^My heart panteth after thee, O God ! " 







79 










Lesson 138. 










a as in all. 

•• 






all 

•• 

small 


ball 
pall 


call 
h^l 


fall 

•• 

wall 


gall 
stall 


caw 
paw 


squall 
haw 


tall 
thrall 


awe 

law 


daw 
maw 


draw 


raw 


saw 


taw 


claw 


straw 


flaw 


■ 

gnaw 


slaw 


thaw 


crawl 
squawk 

balk 
orayze 


squaw 
drawl 
da<^n 
braiyn 

talk 

• 


bawl 

scrawl 

fallen 

drain(n 

walk 


yawl 

sprawl 

la^n 

pai^n 

chalk 


brawl 

hawk 

shaWl 

spayn 

stalk 


,.t^ <yi^ 1^ 


XJLt/^C^^U^ 


^5r^al^'l?lQ 







DICTATION 5PBLLINQ. 

AUTUMN. 
"Winds are swelling round our dwelling, 
All day telling 

Us their woe. 
And at vesper, frosts grow crisper, 
As they whisper 

Of the snow. 
Autumn's sighing, moaning, dying ; 
Clouds are flying 

On, like steeds ; 
While their shadows, o'er the meadows 
Walk like widows 

Decked in weeds.*' —Thomas Buchanan Reed, 



80 







Lesson 140. 


1 








a as in fall. 






bald 

•• 


war 

•• 


warmth 

•• 


MaHd 


gaHz^ 


scald 


ward 


swarm 


fra^d 


paYii§e 


halt 


sward 


warn 


ca^g;Ht 


clai^§e 


malt 


swart 


wart 


naught 


sa^ce 


salt 


thwart 


quart 


taug;Ht 


paAnch 
launch • 


false 


wharf 


warp 


fraugi^t 


waltz 


dwarf 


dai^b 


fai^lt 


a^k 


swath 


warm 


laiS^d 

Lesson 14L 


vatolt 

• 


aH&ht 



SBNTBNCB SPBLLINQ. 

''All to Him I owe." 

The shoemaker uses an awl. 

I made a big haul of fish with my seine. 

The hall is ten feet wide. 

How the boy did bawl when he fell ! 

"What di/all was there, my countrymen ! " 

We pick cotton in the fall. 

" Evil is wrought by want of thought, 

As well as by want of heart." 



81 







Lesson 142. 








a as in care. 




care 


flare 


spare 


stair 


bare 


glare 


square 


chair 


fare' 


scare 


air 


b^r 


pare 


scarce 


fair 


pear 


rare 


stare 


hair 


tear 


tare 


snare 


lair 

Lesson 143. 


wear 



there 

where 

^eir 

their 

pair 

swear 



SBNTBNCB SPBLLINQ. 

The woods are bare in the fall. 

The peach trees bear a fine fruit. 

Fare on the railroad is about three cents a mile. 

I saw a big, black bear at the Fair, 

Pare your pear when you eat one. 

I have a pair of fine fowls. 

Bagging and ties are tare which the mill men do 
not pay for. 

Do not tear your clothes, little man. 

It is not polite to stare at people. 
Come down my winding stairs, said the spider to 
the fly. 



82 







Lesson 144. 








6 like a in fall. 




6r 


gdrge 


born 


corpse 


bdHSHt 


for 


George 


horn 


horse 


fought 


nor 


cork 


corn 


snort 


sought 


orb 


fork 


morn 


sort 


brought 


torch 


stork 


scorn 


short 


thought 


scorch 


form 


thorn 


North 


col^gh (c6ff ) 


lord 


storm 


oH§;Ht 

Lesson 


broad 

145. 


trough (tr6fi) 




SBNTBNOB SPRLIJNO. 




Pause before yo 


u say an < 


angry word, 


1 



The horse paws when he is angry. 

A clause is part of a sentence. 

The cat's claws are sharp. 

** Doth Job serve God for naught}^' 

Place a nought after the one. 

Go, my son, and see if aught be wanting. 

I aught to speak the truth always. 

" Bad manners soil a fine dress more than mud. 

" Kind words bring back kind echoes." 



M 







88 

• 










Lesson 146. 










k as in ask. 






&sk 


flask 


class 


scant 


raft 


bask 


bass 


ant 


slant 


craft 


cask 


lass 


pant 


ranch 


daft 


mask 


mass 


chant 


branch 


bath 


past 


pass 


grant 


blanch 


lath 


task 


brass 


plant 

Lesson 147. 


waft 


path 



SENTENCE SPELLING. 

There are five heirs to the estate. 

Their share is f6,000 each. 

The air is crisp and cold. 

Scotch tweed wears well. 

The clerk sells his wares cheap. 

Boys and girls like to play base. 

It is ba^e to steal. 

Catching sea bass is fine fun. 

Mr. Smith sings a deep ba^s. 

**A sweeter draught was never quaffed.'' 

I drew a draft on my bank. 

** Of their own merits, modest men are dumb/' 

** Be good and kind to those who are old, 

For kindness is better and dearer than gold." 



84 

Lesson 148. 

a as in ask. 

asp glass blast prance chaff 

gasp cast dance lance quaff 

hasp mast France draft chance 

rasp last glance graft draught (draft) 

clasp vast trance shaft grasp 

Copy. 

\X/YV i/YYxJoJyxA^ u>ax^<v> V "yyxxJmJi^ virub 

Lesson 149. 
capital lbttbrs. 

[nemorize. 5pell by dictatioii.] 

1. Begin the first word of every sentence with a 

capital. 

2. Begin every line of poetry with a capital. 

3. The words I and O are always capitals. 

4. Begin proper names with capitals — thus, Alex. 

H. Stephens. Fulton County. Atlanta. 

5. Titles begin with capitals — ^thus, My dear Sir, 

My dear Friend ; His Honor, the Mayor. 

6. Begin with capitals all names of God — thus, 

Father, Creator, Savior, Redeemer, Son of 
God. 

7. The first word of a direct quotation begins with 

a capital — thus, Jesus said, "My yoke is 
easy and my burden light" 



85 







Lesson 150- 










^ as in her. 






her 
err 
were 


mSrgl^ 

verge 

wert 


germ 

fern 

jerk 


sperm 

serge 

stern 


deVth 
search 
hearse 


perch 


herd 


nerve 


swerve 


earn 


verb 


terse 


serve 


eM 


learn 


^erb 
pert 


verse 
term 


berg 
clerk 


pearl 
earth 


yearn 
heard 



Copy. 






sir 

stir 

whir 

irk 

kirk 

dirk 



quirk 

shirk 

bird 

gird 

third 

girl 



Lesson 151. 

1 as in firm, 

twirl skirt 

firm flirt 

squirt 
chirp 
girt birch 

shirt first 



squirm 
dirt 



thirst 

girth 

birth 

mirth 

smirch 

myrrh (mir) 



Copy. 






86 







Lesson 152. 


» 






Q and 6 like fi in 


fur. 




• 

car 


Iflrk. 


churl 


spurt 


bflrst 


burr 


Turk 


urn 


nurse 


curst 


pun- 


turf 


burn 


purse 


durst 


blur 


scurf 


turn 


curse ' 


curve 


slur 


surf 


churn 


lurch 


curb 


spur 


curl 


spurn 


church 


hurl 


curd 


furl 


curt 


urge 


splurge 


word 


work 


hurt 


purge 


worth 


worst 


worse 


world 

Lesson 153. 


worm 


scourge 



DICTATION 5PBLLINQ. 

I shot an arrow into the air ; 
It fell to earth, I know not where ; 
For, so swiftly it flew, the sight 
Could not follow it in its flight. 

I breathed a song into the air ; 
It fell to earth, I know not where ; 
For who has sight so keen and strong. 
That it can follow the flight of song ? 

Long, long afterward, in an oak, 
I found the arrow, still unbroke ; 
And the song, from beginning to end, 
I found again in the heart of a friend. 



87 







Lesson 154. 










q as 06 in food. 






to 

• • 


• 

woo 


school 


swoon 


ooze 


who 


food 


boom 


spoon 


snooze 


two 


mood 


loom 


coop 


noo§e 


sho^ 


brood 


room 


loop 


choo§e 


move 


hoof 


bloom 


roop 


goose 


tomlk^ 


roof 


gloom 


scoop 


loose 


whom 


woof 


groom 

Lesson 155. 


sloop 


moose 



SENTENCE SPELLINQ. 

It is too much for two men to do. I think so, too, 

P^fir tree bears cones. 

Her cape was made oi fur. 

You begin to be rich when you earn more money 
than you spend. 

The Greeks burned their dead and put their ashe? 
into an urn. 

vS^^r/* bathing is fine sport on the sea coast. 

* 

Slaves used to be called serfs. 

The herd of deer has heard the gun. 



88 





^ ^^^-F.RSON 156. 
o as 66 in food. 




lo§e 
whose 


proof 
broom 


boon 
hoot 


stoop 

croon 


roost 
Moor 


prove 

coo 

moo 


cool 
pool 
tool 


droop 

coon 

loon 


booth 

groove 

troop 


poor 

tooth 

shoot 


soothe 


stool 


moon 


whoop 


boot 


rood 
moot 


spool 
spook 


noon 
soon 

Lesson 157 


swoop 
boor 


root 
smooth 



DICTATION SPELLINQ. 
Copy and Memorize. 

" Beautiful faces are they that wear 
The light of a pleasant spirit there ; 
It matters little if dark or fair. 

** Beautiful hands are they that do 
Deeds that are noble, good, and true ; 
Busy with them the long day through. 

** Beautiful feet are they that go 
Swiftly to lighten another's woe. 
Through summer's heat or winter's snow. 

** Beautiful children, if, rich or poor. 
They walk the pathways sweet and pure 
That lead to the mansion strong and sure," 



89 







Lesson 158 


• 






Sounds like oo in 


food. 




ni^ 


fruit 

•• 


spriicl^ 


prun^ 


croHp 


true 


brute 


rule 


soH 


soup 


bruise 


rude 


ruge 


to^r 


group 


cruise 


crude 


Ruth 


your 


throHg;^ 


bruit 


truce 


truth 


youth 


rpHte 


brew 


grew 


flew 


screw 


slew 


crew 


drew 


shrew 


threw 


clew 



Bruii mesins to noise abroad. 

The fool dies as does the 6r7^ie. 

My son, give me thy heart. 

The sun is up, sleepy head. 

The rouie was all the way by water. 

The beet has a big tSiprooL 

Lesson 159. 
dictation spelling. 

NO. 

Few have learned to speak this word 
When it should be spoken ; 

Resolution is deferred, 
Vows to virtue broken. 

More true courage is required, 

This one word to say ; 
Than to stand where shots are fired, 

In the battle fray. 

Use it fitly, and you'll see 

Many a lot below, 
May be schooled and nobly ruled 

3y the power to ut^er — ]>ig, 



90 

Lesson 160. 

The sound of 56 in book. 

b58k cr5&k fc6t put push 

hook shook soot .pull puss 

look brook wood bull wolf 

• 

cook good wool full cls^uid 

took hood hoop bush would 

Copy and learn. 

" Let us gather up the sunbeams, 
Lying all along our path ; 
Let us keep the wheat and roses, 
Casting out the thorns and chaff. 

" Let us find our sweetest comfort 
In the blessings of to-day ; 
With a patient hand removing 
All the briars from our way. 

Lesson 161. 

boy void roil join noi§e 

joy voice soil loin poise 

Roy choice toil groin hoist 

toy boil broil oint joist 

cloy coil spoil joint moist 

Floy foil coin point quoit 

Copy. 

**Lost: Yesterday, somewhere between sunrise 
and sunset, two golden hours, each set with sixty 
diamond minutes. No reward is offered. They are 
gone forever." — Horace Mann. 



91 



• 




Lesson 162. 










ow as in cow. 






bow 


sow 


scow 


drown 


fowl 


cow 


brow 


down 


crown 


howl 


how 


chow 


gown 


frown 


prowl 


mow 


plow 


town 


drowge 


growl 


row 


prow 


brown 


browge 


scowl 


vow 


now 


clown 

Lesson 163. 


owl 


crowd 



SENTENCE SPBLLINQ. 

Bow ! wow ! said Zip. 

See the x^knbow in the sky. 

The boys play on the hay mows. 

The men mow the hay. 

Three little men all in a row. 

The dogs got into a row. 

See the farmer sow his grain. 

The sow has six little pigs. 

Make your bow and say your speech. 

When the bough breaks the cradle will fall. 

Flour is made of wheat. 

The rose is my flower. 



92 







Lesson 164. 








ou as ow in cow. 


» 




thou 


loud 


sound 


lout 


count 


house 


cloud 


wound 


pout 


mount 


louse 


proud 


ground 


rout 


flount 


mouse 


shroud 


ounce 


flout 


gouge 


souse 


boug;H 


bounce 


knout 


loung-e 


bout 


slough 


pounce 


stout 


vouch 


rouge 


droug;Ht 


flounce 


snout 


crouch 


fount 


foul 


trounce 


shout 


slouch 



Lesson 165. 
dictation spellinq. 

Two little girls were sftting near a brook in the 
woods. 

" Listen to that noisy brook/* said one ; ** it scolds 
and scolds. I wish it would keep quiet." 

**Why, sister, it is not scolding; it is singing," 
said the other. 

**The leaves are falling from the trees. How 
bare and ugly they look,'* cried the first speaker. 

** Oh, but it is so pleasant to gather the leaves/ 
was the reply ; ** then we see more of the blue sky, 
and the sun shines on us better." 

The other frowned angrily, and said : " Your ears 
and eyes must be made different from mine." 

If the heart is right, the brooks will sing, not 
scold ; the sky will look blue, and through the bare 
branches God's love will shine. 







98 




■ 






Lesson 166. 










ou as ow in con 


^ 




blou§e 


noun 


our 


scout 


mound 


spouse 


bound 


^our 


spout 


pound 


couch 


hound 


sour 


trout 


round 


pouch 


found 


flour 


scour 


sprout 


gout 


slouch 


south 


mouth 


doul^t 




What hour is it, old witch ? 






Susie is i 


our old witch this time. 





Lesson 167. 
possessive singular nouns. 

[Qlve oat the slag^ular and have the poflMMive singular spelled and 

a sentence written for It.] 



Slnff 

girl 

man 

fly 

Mr. Jones 

Felix 

trout 

mouse 

fowl 

Ruth 

Roy 

goose 



Poss. Sinff. 

girl's The girl's hat is pretty, 

man's The man's wheel is broken, 

fly's The fly's wing is gauzy. 

Mr. Jones's Mr. Jones's house is new. 
Felix's Felix's sled cost one dollar, 

trout's The trout's mouth is large, 

mouse's The mouse's ear is soft. 

The fowl's leg is yellow. 

Ruth's cloak is brown. 

Roy's kite flies high. 

The goose's foot is webbed. 



fowl's 
Ruth's 
Roy's 
goose's 



Lea/rn, — The possessive singular of douds is formed by adding 
the apostrophe (') and s to the nominative. 



94 



Lesson 168. 

REVIEW. 

laugh gauze 

hearth caught 

gape fault 

gnaw pause 

chalk sauce 

false taught 

waltz George 

dwarf corpse 

Lesson 169. 



POSSESSIVE PLURAL NOUNS. 

[Qive put the plurals. Have the possessive plurals spelled. 

Dictate the sentences.] 
Plural. Poss. Plural. 



barque 

marque 

guard ' 

gnarl 

calm 

psalm 

daunt 

salve 



bought 

thought 

cough 

trough 

square 

stair 

pear 

there 



dance 

France 

half 

halve 

wrath 

draught 

were 

verb 



friends 


friends' 


flies 


flies' 


bees 


bees' 


foxes 


foxes' 


thieves 


thieves' 


girls 


girls' 


dogs 


dogs' 


boys 


boys' 


birds 


birds' 


men 


men's 


oxen 


oxen's 



Girls' and ladies' shoes are 
lighter than boys' and men's. 

Oxen's gait is slower than 
horses'. 

Birds' wings are filled with 
long feathers. 



Lea/m, — When the plural does not end in «, add both the apos- 
trophe and the « to form the possessive. When the plural ends in «, 
add only the ai)Ostrophe to form the pcNssessive. 



96 





• 


Lessok 170 


■ 








REVIEW. 






heart 


quart 


brood 


heir 


herb 


squaw 


daub 


ought 


their 


verse 


earl 


earth 


search 


hearse 


heard 


squirm 


squirt 


dirge 


thirst 


myrrh 


nurse 


church 


urge 


word 


work 


world 


worui 


worse 


scourge 


two 


move 


tomb 


whom 


lose 


whose 


school 


Moor 


choose 


most 


soothe 


bruise 


fruit 


son 


tour 


your 


youth 


croup 


soup 

Lesson 171 


group 

• 


through 



DICTATION SPELLING. 

THE BEES' JOURNEY. 
A bee-keeper sprinkled with flour the backs of 

his bees as they were leaving the hive. About forty 
miles away lived a friend of his, who had a clover- 
field in full bloom. 

The next day the bee-keeper received a letter 
from his friend, saying: **Your white-jacket bees 
have arrived. There are whole swarms in my clover- 
field. *' The bees had traveled those forty miles in 
a day's time. It was truly a wonderful instinct that 
drew these bees so far from home in search of 
honey. 



96 







Lisbon 172. 










RBview. 






screw 


book 


took 


good 


soot 


put 


pull 


bull- 


full 


bush 


wolf 


could 


would 


should 


void 


voice 


choice 


broil 


oint 


noise 


moist 


quoit 


plow 


drown 


browse 


crowd 


house 


mouse 


couch 


pouch 


bough 


drought 


noun 


ounce 


hour 


flour 


south 


rout 


scout 


scour 


count 


lounge 


round 


doubt 


swarm 



Lesson 173. 

Copy and Reproduce. 
DICTATION 5PBLLINQ. 

Beautiful eyes are those that show 
Beautiful thoughts that burn below ; 
Beautiful lips are those whose words 
Leap from the heart like song of birds ; 
Beautiful hands are those that do 
Work that is earnest, and brave, and true. 
Moment by moment, the whole day through. 

Little moments make an hour ; 

Little thoughts, a book ; 
Little seeds, a tree or flower ; 

Water drops, a brook ; 
Little deeds of faith and love, 
Make a home for you above. 



VI 





Lbssov 174. 






WORDS COMMONLY MISPRONOUNCED. 




[Spell and Pronoonce Dtottnetly ] 




ar^ 


haHnch 


pert 


sd6t 


pars^ 


' th6r^ 


6rr 


put 


calm 


wher^ 


w6rs(5 


boil 


palm 


their 


booth 


join 


^salm 


ask 


hoof 


soil 


da^nt 


rasp 


hoofs 


point 


ga^nt 


ant 


roof 


joist 


ta-Hnt 


danc^ 


coop 


iib^nt 


salv^ 


half 


poor 


drown^<5 


h^art 


calf 


truths 

•• 


sous^ 


gap^ 


bath 


t^ur 


drou§;Ht 


balk 

•• 


wer^ 


y^yr 


rout 


dwarf 

•• 


perch 


r^ut^ 


hab^nt 



Lesson 175. 

Copy and Reproduce. 
DICTATION SPBLLINQ. 

True worth is in being, not seeming^^ 
In doing, each day that goes by, 

Some little good — not dreaming 
Of great things to do by and by ; 

For, whatever men say in blindness, 

And spite of the fancies of youth. 
There is nothing so kingly as kindness, 



And nothing so royal as truth. 



— Alice Cory, 



98 



wharf 


wharvc 


calf 


calves 


half 


halves 


life 


lives 


wife 


wives 


wolf 


wolve^s 


cuff 


cuffs 


puff 


puffs 


dwarf 


dwarfs 


hoof 


hoofs 


roof 


roofs 



Lbsson 176. 

PLURALS. 
[Main m Mateaea lor each woftf.] 
Plunl. Singular. 

proof 
raft 
Turk 
shoe 




nerve 

booth 

truth 

sffjup S^^^dcude. 

tooth 



goose 
mouse 



moral. 

proofs 

rafts 

Turks 

shoes 

nerves 

booths 

truths 

soups 

teeth 

geese 

mice 



Lesson 177. 

Copy and Reproduce. 
DICTATION SPELLING. 

If you've any task to do, 
Let me whisper, friend, to you, 
Doit. 

If youVe anything to say. 
True and needed, yea or nay. 
Say it. 

If you've anything to love, 
As a blessing from above. 
Love it. 

If you've anything to give. 
That another's joy may live, 

Give it. ^Mary Mopes Dodge, 



blow 

blew 

blown 

do 

did 

done 

fly 

flew 

flown 

drink 

drank 

drunk 

draw 

drew 

drawn 

freeze 

froze 

frozen 



99 

Lesson 178. 

VERB5. 
SENTBNCE SPELLING. 

[Call for ft new sentence for each word.] 

** Blow, bugle, blow.** 

Little Boy Blue blew his horn. 

The leaves were blown about. 

Dare to do right. 

He did his best, his very best. 

She has done what she could. 

Lady-bird, lady-bird, fly away. 

The hawk flew high. 

The birds have flown away. 

Drink pure water, sir. 

He drank at the spring. 

Only water was drunk. 

Can you draw ? 

He drew a good picture. 

His picture was badly drawn. 

The pond will freeze to*night. 

The water froze in the pitcher. 

The ground has frozen. 



100 

Lesson 179. 



• 




VERBS. 


• 






[llidn 


) lentenoM for each 


word.] 




give 


know 


ring 


sing 


swim 


g^ve 


knew 


rang 


sang 


swam 


^^ven 


known 


rung 


sung 


swum 


>.^o 


lie 


rise 


speak 


take 


went 


lay 


rose 


spoke 


took 


gone 


lain 


risen 
TiESSON 180. 


spoken 

1 


taken 



SENTENCE SPELLING. 

Now I lay me down to sleep. 

I must lie down to rest. 

Lay this book on the table. 

The book lies on the table. 

He lay on the grass. 

He laid the book away. 

The hen has laid five eggs. 

The eggs have lain in the nest a week. 

She has laid down the law. 

He has lain in bed long enough. 



101 





Lesson 


181. 






PA5T TENSE AND PAST PARTICIPLE FORMS. 


[Qlve out the present tense form ; have the other form spelled, and a 




sentence made for it In each case.] 




fan 


fanned 


tag 


• tagged 


pen 


penned 


wag 


wagged 


sin 


sinned 


beg 


begged 


hem 


hemmed 


brag 


bragged 


rob 


robbed 


clog 


clogged 


sob 


sobbed 


drug 


drugged 


rub 


rubbed 


snag 


snagged 


stab 


stabbed 


rap 


rapped 


fur 


furred 


map 


mapped 


tar 


tarred 


tap 


tapped 


jar 


jarred 


sip 


sipped 


knob 


knobbed 


dip 


dipped 


trim 


trimmed 


step 


stepped 


thin 


thinned 


shop 


shopped 


snag 


snagged 


swap 


swapped 


s 


TjESSON 


182. 





RuLB. — When a monosyllable ends in a consonant preceded by 
a single vowel, double the final consonant when the suifix begins 
with a vowel. 

Find out exactly what this rule means, and then spell the past 
tense forms of 



lift 


dash 


drain 


cheer 


ditch 
mend 


pump 
dread 


weight 
reach 


piece 
guide 


rent 
earn 


play 
aid • 


gear 
weed 


sight 
groan 



102 



Lesson 183. 



[Qlvd oat the flngnlar. Have pupils >P«U the plurals and make 

sentences for eacT 




page 

cage 

watch 

gulch 

ditch 

peach 

church 

inch 

bunch 

coach 

ash 

blush 

bush 

dish 



Plural 

ox'en 

box'es 

six'es 

ax'es 

fenc'es 

ic'es 

fac'es 

pric'es 

ounc'es 

sauc'es 

danc'es 

quinc'es 

piec'es 



PLURALS. 

each one.] 
Singular. 

base 




vase 
rose 
nose 
corpse 
sense 
tense 
hedge 
badge 
edge 
\/ hinge 
vV change 
^ breeze 



Lesson 184. 



pag'es 

cag'es 

watch' es 

gulch'es 

ditch'es 

peach'es 

church'es 

inch'es 

bunch'es 

coach'es 

ash'es 

blush'es 

bush'es 

dish'es 



scourge 

siege 

barge 

gorge 

glass 

miss 

witch 

bruise 

kiss 

dress 

match 

torch 

child 

rich 



Plural. 

bas'es 

vas'es 

ros'es 

nos'es 

corp s'es 

sens'es 

ten s'es 

hedg'es 

badg'es 

edg'es 

hing'es 

chang'es 

breez'es 



scourg'es 

sieg'es 

barg'es 

gorg'es 

glass'es 

mis s'es 

witch'es 

bruis'es 

kiss 'es 

dress'es 

match' es 

torch'es 

chil'dren 

rich'es 



103 





Lesson 


185. 




jjsal'ter 


b€i,'vgr 


hOs'tlgr 


mtit'tgr 


fal'ter 


ei'ther 


lar'ger 


clus'ter 


quar'ter 


nei'ther 


sOl'der 


cum'ber 


sau'cer 


wheth'er 


won'der 


gut'ter 


bor'der 


lep'er 


squan'der 


rud'der 


daugh'ter 


pes'ter 


prop'er 


sum'mef 


cor'ner 


sev'er 


yon'der 


sun'der 


pau'per 


let'ter 


brew'er 


blun'der 


slaugh'ter 


fes'ter 


coop'er 


lum'ber 


raft'er 


neth'er 


schoon'er 


num'ber 




TjESSON 


.186. 




after 


, s^ep'ter 


ew'er 


slum'ber 


slan'der 


shePter 


pew'ter 


sput'ter 


plas'ter 


pOr'ter 


sew'er 


stut'ter 


an'swer 


ten'der 


skew'er 


snuffer 


mas'ter 


bath'er 


neu'ter 


blus'ter 


le'ver 


cof'fer 


flut'ter 


but'ter 


feVer 


cop'per 


mus'ter 


crup'per 


ea'ger 


con'quer 


sump'ter 


flus'ter 


mea'ger 


offer 


blub'ber 


shut'ter 


beak'er 


tot'ter 


hun'ger 


plun'der 



104 



courtship 

daybreak 

day 'light 

house'hold 

house' wife 

sports'man 

down'right 

draw'bridge 

soap 'stone 

soap'suds 

free'stone 



worm'wood 

friend'ship 

free 'hold 

fresh'man 

sea'man 

fore'ground 

knick'knack 



Lesson 187. 

COnPOUND WORDS. 

gold'finch 

gold'smith 

ground'work 

false'hood 

stag'hound 

sauce'pan 

stair'case 

there'fore 

where'fore 

wher ev'er 

hard'ware 

Lesson 188. 

hand'spike 

num'skuU 

dove'tail 

down'cast 

draughts 'man 

fore'thought 

knap'sack 



draw'back 

drum'stick 

spend'thrift 

fire'side 

fools'cap 

straight'way 

footstool 

fore' noon 

brick'bat 

bride'groom 

buck' wheat 



ice'berg 

whale'bone 

high'land 

head' ache 

false'hood 

head 'stall 

piece'meal 



DICTATION SPBLLINQ. 

** Diligence is the mother of good luck/' 

** Do not do that which you would not have known.' ' 

— Pdor /Richard 

** Whatever is worth doing at all is worth doing 

well. ' ' --Lcrd Chesterfield, 

*' Be there a will, and wisdom finds a way." 

— Ctahbe, 

* * They are slaves who dare not be 
In the right with two or three." 

—-James Russell Lowell. 



GUIDE TO PRONUNCIATION. 

VOWELS. 



& as in bake 


Q 


> 


as in dg 


a 


fat 


m 

C 


f 


" come 


a 


care 


* 
G 


► 


" nor 


a 


last 


? 


► 


" wolf 

• 


a 


car 


TO 


" tool 


3 


all 

•• 


6o 


*' took 


a 

• 


what 

• 


ou 


" out (unmarked) 






ow 


" now 


e 


m€ 


oi 


** voice ** 


e 


met 


oy 


" boy 


e 


h5r 








s 


they 


Q 




" tone 


e 


there 






" not 
*' bush 


I 


fine 


u 




'* turn 


I " 


pin 


u 

ff • 




" rude 

• • 


I 


bird 








i 


police 


y 


. 


" try 
** story 


" 


no 


M4 

y 




" myrtle 


" 


not 












CONSONANTS. 


*€— k as 


in eat 




X— 


'ks as in tax 


*9— s ' 


* 9ent 




?- 


•gz " ejist 


eh— k ' 


^ chorus 




ph. 


-f " sylph 


9h— sh ' 


* machine 




qu- 


-kw " queen 


g-g ' 


' get 




wh« 


=-hw " what 


g-j ' 


' dan'ger 




th 


" thin 


dg-j ' 


' edge 




th 


" smooth 


§=z ' 


• i§ 




ng 


" sing 


ci— sh ' 


' gra'cious 


^ 






ti==sh * 


* mo'tion 








si=sh ' 


' pas'sion 
' oc ca'sion 




^ When placed at the beginnii 


si=zh * 


L . 




of a syllable. 



Note. -c before e, 1, and y Is soft ; as cede, cite, cycle. 

c before a, o, u, and consonants Is hard ; as cat, coat, cut. fact. 

c at the end of a syllable Is liard unless followed by e or i.